A&S Smocked Chemise

I recently took part in Drachenwald’s first A&S exchange – DASE: Drachenwald Arts and Science Exchange.

After some thinking about my garb I decided to make an undergarment for two reasons.  One, it’s something I’ve never properly done for my European garb and two, it’s something the recipient would wear often.  I decided on a chemise with a honeycomb smocked neckline from the 16th century German Renaissance because I came across this page.   

The Chemise:

DSC09605DSC09607DSC09608

DSC09611
DSC09612

The instructions were clear but I didn’t realise that the neck wasn’t separate – this caused me some confusion at first when it came to sewing it together.  The grid pattern also shows the whole sleeve length and not the folded sleeve length. After some swearing and trying to work with inches I figured it all out.  For this chimise I used a light weight white cotton.

 

 

 

Neck sides and shoulders.  Seeing it stitched I can see the neckline better.  And it’s huge, but the instructions do mention this and the neck does get smaller.

 

 

 

A slit down the front so you can put it on.  I overlocked the edge with a rolled hem.  It’s a neat finish.

 

 

 

 

Sleeves and gussets followed by sides.

 

 

 

 

The basic smock is finished – now for the honeycomb smocking at the neck

 

Honeycomb smoking:

DSC09737 DSC09738 DSC09739 DSC09740DSC09742

 

 

Because the original was done in inches and I had a tape measure with inches I worked in inches.  I used chalk to mark half inch points.

 

 

With a running stitch I connected the points with black thread [any contract thread will work – it gets pulled out].  The threads are then pulled gently to create a pleated effect.

 

 

 

The folds of the pleats are caught with a double stitch in a alternating fashion.  This was surprisingly easy but incredibly time consuming.

 

 

 

 

Finished honeycomb smocking

 

 

 

 

Washed to remove chalk and then given a quick steam press.

DSC09741

 

 

 

 

 

 

Complete honeycomb smocked chemise.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *